Yellowknife 2019

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Antares
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Yellowknife 2019

Post by Antares » Sat Jan 18, 2020 4:45 pm

I compiled these stats from EC
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January 2020 has been much colder than normal there so far. Can't wait to see the final numbers for this month there. :think:
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Re: Yellowknife 2019

Post by moonshadow0825 » Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:09 am

That is very cool (no pun intended) and agree will be very interesting to see the 2020 numbers.

Are you doing this as a proxy for climate change or just interest?

I know that the arctic warmed up a couple of times over the past millennia (see below for 1 source) so it will be interesting to see where we end up in the next few decades
Moving on, Moore et al. (2001) analyzed sediment cores from Donard Lake, Baffin Island, Canada, producing a 1240-year record of average summer temperatures for this Arctic region. Over the entire period from AD 750-1990, temperatures averaged 2.9°C. However, anomalously warm decades with summer temperatures as high as 4°C occurred around AD 1000 and 1100, while at the beginning of the 13th century, Donard Lake witnessed “one of the largest climatic transitions in over a millennium,” as “average summer temperatures rose rapidly by nearly 2°C from 1195-1220 AD, ending in the warmest decade in the record” with temperatures near 4.5°C.

This rapid warming of the 13th century was followed by a period of extended warmth that lasted until an abrupt cooling event occurred around 1375, which made the following decade one of the coldest in the record. This event signaled the onset of the Little Ice Age, which lasted for 400 years, until a gradual warming trend began around 1800, which was followed by a dramatic cooling event in 1900 that brought temperatures back to levels similar to those of the Little Ice Age. This cold regime lasted until about 1950, whereupon temperatures warmed for about two decades but then tended downwards again, all the way to the end of the record in 1990. Thus, in this part of the Arctic, the Medieval Warm Period was also warmer than it is there currently.
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Re: Yellowknife 2019

Post by Antares » Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:20 am

moonshadow0825 wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:09 am
That is very cool (no pun intended) and agree will be very interesting to see the 2020 numbers.

Are you doing this as a proxy for climate change or just interest?

I know that the arctic warmed up a couple of times over the past millennia (see below for 1 source) so it will be interesting to see where we end up in the next few decades
Just out of interest. Visited there last year around late June/early July.

Last year was 0.3 colder compared to average (-4.6C vs -4.3C), with March being noticeably above average. May through August was quite a bit below normal, as well as December.
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Re: Yellowknife 2019

Post by moonshadow0825 » Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:27 am

Antares wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:20 am
Just out of interest. Visited there last year around late June/early July.

Last year was 0.3 colder compared to average (-4.6C vs -4.3C), with March being noticeably above average. May through August was quite a bit below normal, as well as December.
well I look forward to your future accumulation of data :D

to be honest I am fascinated by both the medieval warm period and the little ice age periods of history, there's a ton of information on the effects in Europe but we're only just beginning to learn about how North America and the rest of the world weathered those periods. I think that knowledge would guide us during the current changes.
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Re: Yellowknife 2019

Post by Antares » Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:17 am

moonshadow0825 wrote:
Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:27 am
well I look forward to your future accumulation of data :D

to be honest I am fascinated by both the medieval warm period and the little ice age periods of history, there's a ton of information on the effects in Europe but we're only just beginning to learn about how North America and the rest of the world weathered those periods. I think that knowledge would guide us during the current changes.
Thanks. :D

From what I remember, Alaska was warmer/drier during the LIA due to persistent ridging in the North Pacific. :think:
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